Ask President Obama to Support Protection for Horses (via Straight from the Horse’s Heart)

Hi All,

Please share this posting written by Laura Allen from Animal Law Coalition, let’s stand together. The spirit of the Wild-Mustang is to be forever free.

Thanks

Ask President Obama to Support Protection for Horses by Laura Allen from Animal Law Coalition Your Voice Can Make a Difference Today, Tuesday January 25 at 9 p.m. EST, President Obama will deliver his 2011 State of the Union Address, which will be streamed live on YouTube. We have submitted a question to President Obama for an exclusive YouTube Interview that will take place just two days later, on January 27. Votes are needed in order to have this question considered and addressed. We want to know … Read More

via Straight from the Horse’s Heart

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A Dog’s Night Be4 Christmas

Twas the night before Christmas

I tore through the house
Not a human was stirring
‘Cause they were passed out like drunken louse
The stockings were hung on the mantel with care


So I jumped, and I jumped…. Knowing organic dog treats would be there
Daddy and Mommy were nestled all snug in their chairs
While visions of Lamborghinis and Blue diamonds danced in their heads
When all of a sudden I heard such a clatter
As I turned around it was Rusty with his tail expanding fatter and fatter
Perched in the tree watching the ornaments scatter and shatter


Do I bark, do I…. nah
Imma forget the rules and chase me a kitty tonight
Like a doggie agility course I took off with a dash
It was I, and the cat entangled in a clash
His claws tore open the sash on my stocking
When, what to my eyes wonders should appear
All the organic dog treats I couldn’t get near


So lively and quick I began to eat
Scrumptious morsels of holiday treats
Then at that moment I heard on the roof
A familiar, yet echoing sound
As I drew in my head, and was turning around
Down the chimney he came with a bound
It’s Charlie the Cockatiel
We thought he was lost
But now he’s found
With a look in his eyes


He began to exclaim
Merry Christmas To All,  And To All A Good Night!

A Furry Tail Came True

Over the weekend I received some disturbing news

From one of my Facebook friends regarding a hybrid dog named Shoonka.  At the eleventh hour of his canine life he was facing death and not by any fault of his own.

Miraculously this situation had a happy ending, but far too many times it ends in the MURDER of a family’s former healthy hybrid dog.  Given the current economic situations of many Pet Parents today, it’s tragic when these caregivers of wolf-dogs don’t find a suitable home for their once adored pets.  The outcome is usually death becomes her / him.

I am elated to share with you all Shoonka has found a home.  He’ll be in his new digs just before the New Year (more like next week Sunday).

So in showing of gratitude, I dedicate this post to you ALL who made it happen for Shoonka the four-legged little Angel during his time of need.

In this season of giving and celebration… it’s deeply gratifying to know saving a life is the best gift of all, and I am ever so blessed to be connected with such wonderful people.

Love Wave•*¨*•.¸¸•*¨*• •*¨*•.¸¸•*¨*• and Gratitude

Now I depart you with this; 

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and etc., etc., etc.

*My selection of the wording above was chosen for the following reason:  When one says an Animal is being destroyed, put down, euthanized, lets’ call it for what it truly is MURDER (there is a life force here) not an object such as a Building, Car, Bio Waste, or out dated files normally sent off to Shred-it… those are things A.K.A. garbage not a former Pet.
Mercy killings are excluded from this hence terminal illnesses effecting the quality of life & etc., etc.

4 Shoonka The Hybrid Dog

Wolf-dogs are one of the most misunderstood animals in the world.

This is a revised post, or one may say more of a marriage between two of my previous postings, given the current situation Shoonka is in.  The other posting was  “The Dog Whisperer Meets The Wolf-Dog”  http://bit.ly/cJO6cD which provided some educational insight to what a wolf-dog is and the reasons why hybrid dogs are killed unlike other former pet dog in animal shelters.

Our ignorance to have them as pets has placed them in harm’s way, how so you may ask:  Did you know an estimate number of Wolf-dogs once in a domestic settings are being euthanized each year range up to 10,000.  Tomorrow could be Shoonka’s last day if he doesn’t find a home.

NANCY BROWN PROVIDES THE CORRECT DEFINITION ERASING ALL MYTHS.

Animal Control and Legal Issues

Regulation of wolf hybrids varies greatly in different parts of the country. Federal Animal Welfare Act regulations define hybrids as domestic animals, and they are regulated as are other dogs. Several States require permits to keep hybrids, a few States prohibit their possession, and many States do not regulate them at all.

Hybrids can pose perplexing problems for local animal control agencies. The question of jurisdiction is often unclear. Local animal control ordinances are often written exclusively for dogs. Most State wildlife agencies do not regard wolf hybrids as wildlife even though the animals may be legally defined as being wild or exotic. As a result, many hybrids may not be regulated by any local statute, making troublesome animals and owners a difficult problem for their communities.

Yet another problem for animal control agencies is the difficulty in identifying an animal as a wolf hybrid. There is no test currently available that will differentiate a hybrid from a dog or a wolf. Animal control agencies often must rely solely on the word of the owner in determining whether or not an animal is a wolf hybrid. Recently developed techniques, such as genetic probing, hold some promise as possible methods of identification, but no work is being done with regard to wolf hybrids.

Many animal shelters have had difficulties dealing with hybrids. Aside from housing and handling concerns, adoption to the public has proven to be risky. In 1988, a wolf hybrid was adopted from a humane society shelter in Florida. Several hours after it was taken home, it escaped from its new owner’s fenced yard and killed a neighbor’s 4-year-old boy. The shelter was sued and paid $425,000 in a settlement to the child’s parents. Since this incident, shelters around the country have been reluctant to put these animals up for adoption. Instead, the animals are euthanized once the required holding period is over.

Rabies vaccination for wolf hybrids is yet another difficult issue. Although it is likely that current rabies vaccines are as efficacious in the hybrid as they are in the dog, Federal regulations require that any vaccine be tested in a species before it can be approved for use in that species. Due to the expense, no such testing has ever been done on either wolves or hybrids. Regardless, many hybrids have been vaccinated with canine rabies vaccine. Such vaccinations are not officially recommended or recognized, and in some States may even be illegal. Consequently, hybrids that have bitten someone are often treated differently than a dog would be. In many cases the hybrid must be destroyed and the brain examined, regardless of whether or not it was vaccinated for rabies.

In some States, veterinarians have had legal problems as a result of treating wolf hybrids in their practices. Recently, a veterinarian in New Jersey was sued and found liable for damages after a wolf hybrid he had treated later bit someone. To further complicate matters, veterinarians may find that their malpractice insurance does not offer coverage in a suit involving a wolf hybrid, if the hybrid has no permit or is owned illegally. The American Veterinary Medical Association recently issued a statement saying that their malpractice insurance carrier would not cover suits involving wolf hybrids if the animal’s owner has no permit in a State that requires one, or if hybrids are prohibited in the State in which the incident occurred.

What can you do to save Wolf-dogs and help educate others who want them

By doing some of the following:

  • Sponsor a Wolf-dog from a Wolf-dog Sanctuary.
  • Volunteer your time at a Wolf-dog Sanctuary if you can not afford to sponsor one.
  • By sharing this post.
  • Do some major research, speak with a Veterinarian, find out what your State’s regulations are.
  • Watching this Documentary video.

*Animal Control & Legal Issues (Excerpts from USDAhttp://www.nal.usda.gov)

Lastly let’s see if we can find Shoonka a home if you need more information about him see this posting http://wp.me/p18lXA-9Z then reach out to either Adrienne at adriennebolt@aol.com or Linda at wolfpawmountain@gmail.com

Let’s do it people and make some magic  XOXO ~Nia~

Can We Save Shoonka By Monday

I am sharing this post out of urgency. 

If  Shoonka’s owner cannot find a home for him by Monday, December 20, 2010 Shoonka will be PUT TO DEATH!
Shoonka is a male Timber/Tundra/Malamute Wolf-dog who is loosing his only known home due to landlord issues.
Shoonka’s studly attributes are:

  • He’s very loving and affectioned boy.
  • Shoonka is low and quite.

He is around 5-6 years old, neutered, and up to date on shots.  Shoonka is good with other dogs,  he’s good with the owner’s horses, yet it would be advisable he is kept away from livestock and small animals.  Wolf-dogs have a strong prey drive.

Shoonka is house, and crate trained, he enjoys leash walking and even running along his owner’s ATV so would make a great jogging partner!

Shoonka rides well in vehicles, but can be a bit protective of his truck, Shoonka will bark when visitors approach but will calm down and has shown no aggressions with food or toys.

He’s a gentle giant, bit of an escape artist and will need secure Wolf-dog fencing (Wolf-dogs are able to jump 6 feet straight off the ground without a running leap to clear a fence.  It’s strongly recommended to have a closure for Wolf-dogs, in conjunction to the post being firmly secured by concrete several feet under ground. Wolf-dogs are highly experienced natural diggers, they excavate their dens in the wild).

Shoonka has climbed a six-foot fence so you’ll need to have LEAN INS/hot wire.  A hot wire also on the bottom or a dig guard/RR ties… he needs Wolf-dog fencing.

Shoonka is a special boy who would make a wonderful, playful companion.  He would do best with a girlfriend or other canine friend.  This is a delightful animal who just needs the right loving folks to give him a wonderful home.

Come on folk, please share this post with your friends and family, and let’s band together and try to save Shoonka’s life.  If you’re in, or near Western Colorado please contact Adrienne at adriennebolt@aol.com

Thanks guys, and sorry for the short notice.

~Nia~

The Dog Whisperer Meets the Wolf-Dog!

In the Spirit of The Wolf-dog

Did anyone else catch last Friday’s nights episode?  I was pleased to see Cesar Millan addressed this growing issue along with his Special Guest Jennifer McCarthy, Wolf-dog Master.

Yes…  Wolf-dogs are such majestic creatures to behold, when I first saw one the day I was standing on a line at PetSmart during my weekly run…  without turning my head from the corner of my eye I see this magnificent beast of a dog.  It was ENORMOUS, on all fours her height alone had to be over 3.5 feet tall, which I can say with confidence because I’m 5’9″.  Of course by now, you know I’m looking with both eyes, her paws were a bit larger than the size of my fist, and her broadness, OMG purely solid.  With such a puppy dog face, my heart melted, nearly everyone who had the balls to walk by her when they entered or exited the store stopped and inquired “how old”  the answer; “8 months”.  Next question “which breed” the answer; “Wolf-dog”.  No need in asking about the gender, there were no dangling participles apparent.

The sheer size of her was mind-blowing, therefore I recognize why there’s  been such an unyielding desire of ownership and bragging status for the Wolf-dog.  Unfortunately this has come as a double edge blade for the beloved Wolf/Dog mix.

Most Wolf-dog owners underestimate the responsibility associated in owning this hybrid Wolf/Dog pet (and I use the word “Pet” loosely).  As puppies they appear to be controllable until they bulk up in weight, develop their personalities, then do what they are designed to do…. graduate to their pack position where conflict begins between owner and pet.

The Wolf-dog has now connected to its identity, equally as human adolescents do.  Which happens to be against most Wolf-dog owners and some Parents intentions.  How do you think these owners who have lost control handle this frustrating situation… they surrender or kick the Wolf-dog out of its adopted human pack.

Wolf-dogs are one of the most misunderstood animals in the world.

Our ignorance to have them as pets has placed them in harm’s way, how so you may ask:  Did you know an estimate number of Wolf-dogs once in a domestic settings are being euthanized each year range up to 10,000.

Nancy Brown provides the correct definition erasing all myths.

Animal Control and Legal Issues

Regulation of wolf hybrids varies greatly in different parts of the country. Federal Animal Welfare Act regulations define hybrids as domestic animals, and they are regulated as are other dogs. Several States require permits to keep hybrids, a few States prohibit their possession, and many States do not regulate them at all.

Hybrids can pose perplexing problems for local animal control agencies. The question of jurisdiction is often unclear. Local animal control ordinances are often written exclusively for dogs. Most State wildlife agencies do not regard wolf hybrids as wildlife even though the animals may be legally defined as being wild or exotic. As a result, many hybrids may not be regulated by any local statute, making troublesome animals and owners a difficult problem for their communities.

Yet another problem for animal control agencies is the difficulty in identifying an animal as a wolf hybrid. There is no test currently available that will differentiate a hybrid from a dog or a wolf. Animal control agencies often must rely solely on the word of the owner in determining whether or not an animal is a wolf hybrid. Recently developed techniques, such as genetic probing, hold some promise as possible methods of identification, but no work is currently being done with regard to wolf hybrids.

Many animal shelters have had difficulties dealing with hybrids. Aside from housing and handling concerns, adoption to the public has proven to be risky. In 1988, a wolf hybrid was adopted from a humane society shelter in Florida. Several hours after it was taken home, it escaped from its new owner’s fenced yard and killed a neighbor’s 4-year-old boy. The shelter was sued and paid $425,000 in a settlement to the child’s parents. Since this incident, shelters around the country have been reluctant to put these animals up for adoption. Instead, the animals are euthanized once the required holding period is over.

Rabies vaccination for wolf hybrids is yet another difficult issue. Although it is likely that current rabies vaccines are as efficacious in the hybrid as they are in the dog, Federal regulations require that any vaccine be tested in a species before it can be approved for use in that species. Due to the expense, no such testing has ever been done on either wolves or hybrids. Regardless, many hybrids have been vaccinated with canine rabies vaccine. Such vaccinations are not officially recommended or recognized, and in some States may even be illegal. Consequently, hybrids that have bitten someone are often treated differently than a dog would be. In many cases the hybrid must be destroyed and the brain examined, regardless of whether or not it was vaccinated for rabies.

In some States, veterinarians have had legal problems as a result of treating wolf hybrids in their practices. Recently, a veterinarian in New Jersey was sued and found liable for damages after a wolf hybrid he had treated later bit someone. To further complicate matters, veterinarians may find that their malpractice insurance does not offer coverage in a suit involving a wolf hybrid, if the hybrid has no permit or is owned illegally. The American Veterinary Medical Association recently issued a statement saying that their malpractice insurance carrier would not cover suits involving wolf hybrids if the animal’s owner has no permit in a State that requires one, or if hybrids are prohibited in the State in which the incident occurred.

What can you do to save Wolf-dogs and help educate others who want them

By doing some of the following:

  • Sponsor a Wolf-dog from a Wolf-dog Sanctuary.
  • Volunteer your time at a Wolf-dog Sanctuary if you can not afford to sponsor one.
  • By sharing this post.
  • Do some major research, speak with a Veterinarian, find out what your State’s regulations are.
  • Watching this Documentary video.

If you’re ever in the North Carolina Black Mountain area…  stop by Full Moon Farms learn about Wolf-dogs and spread the word around to educate others.  Show support of the Wolf-dogs rites of passage.  You may also follow “Full Moon Farms” on Twitter, I am.

Sanctuary & Rescue Links:

Wild Spirit Wolf Sanctuary, New Mexico

www.wildspiritwolfsanctuary.org

Howling Woods Farms , New Jersey

www.howlingwoods.org

*Animal Control & Legal Issues (Excerpts from USDAhttp://www.nal.usda.gov)

Of course I feel deeply sorry for the Parent’s who lost their four-year old child.  The very reason one should think with extreme caution before obtaining a Wolf-dog as a pet.

Fact: Wolf-dogs are able to jump 6 feet straight off the ground without a running leap to clear a fence.  It’s strongly recommended to have a closure for Wolf-dogs 6 feet high, in conjunction to the post being firmly secured by concrete several feet under ground. Wolf-dogs are highly experienced natural diggers, they excavate their dens in the wild.

Friday FreeStyle Dance By Gin The Dog

Doggone it I’m speechless

I never heard about Gin, Britain’s fabulous dancing dog until the earlier part of this year when I was able to meet both Kate and Gin while attending the Montel Williams Show.

So, in being of my weekly tradition of the Friday Happy Dance video, enjoy this twisted tail version dance…  I leave you in canine style Woof woof, because they do it better.

 

Help Stop the Federal Wolf Killing Plan

Please don’t let history repeat itself here in the United States.

We destroyed every one of our Native Wolves, if not for our Canadian friends we would not have been able to reintroduced Wolves back to Yellowstone. And once more they are in danger. Learn about their history and see how they’ve benefit our Eco system by their return.

Benefits of Wolves : The ecological and economic benefits they bring.

Wolves are the top predator in most environments in which they live and the trickle down effect of their presence is astounding. In Yellowstone, prior to the wolves’ reintroduction in 1995, elk basically roamed wherever they chose and tended to spend most of their time in the river valleys.

This excessive streamside grazing prevented willow and cottonwood tree growth along the river banks. But when the wolf returned, the elk quickly learned they couldn’t set up permanent housekeeping in the valleys and they moved on to make a living in other areas. This, in turn, allowed young trees to grow along the riverbeds. The new trees shaded the river water, creating improved habitat for trout, which thrive in cooler, darker waters. The new willows and cottonwoods attract additional migratory birds and provided new food sources and building materials for beavers.

The beavers then built dams which created new marshes and wetlands that in turn attracted otters, ducks and other species. Wolves provide tremendous economic benefits.

Ecotourism:

Is quickly moving to the forefront of family recreational activities. The longing to see animals in their natural habitat has created an economic boom throughout the United States. In Yellowstone, fishing has always been a big industry and the improved environment along the river caused by the wolf’s presence has improved fishing opportunities. The wolves themselves are also a huge tourist draw, with many people making Yellowstone their vacation destination expressly for the purpose of seeing wolves. Indeed, most sunrises in Yellowstone are accompanied by rows and rows of nature lovers with spotting scopes, all straining for a glimpse of the elusive wolf.

Wolves pose little threat to livestock and humans. In fact, their prey of choice has been wild game like deer and elk for centuries. The same is true for human/wolf interactions. Despite claims by wolf opponents, the fact remains that aggression by wolves against humans is a very rare event.

However there are many who wish to see one of Nature’s treasures controlled by mass killings due to slaughter of their livestock, when there are other was to address the issue.

And now that you know the Wolf a little better please take the time out and sign the petition to stop the Federal Wolf Killing Plan by clicking on the following link below.

http://animals.change.org/petitions/view/help_stop_the_federal_wolf_killing_plan

 

*Steve Irwin – Benefits of Wolves : The ecological and economic benefits they bring.

Com’ On Down And Meet The Breeds In NYC…

Hey All,

It’s gonna be a great weekend to be out & about in the Big Apple.  If you missed the Felines swaggering their stuff yesterday as they walked down the Catwalk, don’t miss out on “Meet The Breeds” this weekend in NYC at the Javits Center.

It’s gonna be fun & exciting… sneak peek at some of the vendors and who else will be there:

Where: Jacob K. Javits Convention Center
655 West 34th Street
New York, New York 10001
When:   Saturday, October 16th, 2010 from 10 am – 5 pm
Sunday, October 17th, 2010 from 10 am – 5 pm